Campion.

“The most powerful experiences we have as humans are a combination of psyche, love and erotica, which can really lock you in an extraordinarily powerful way to experiences beyond what you know and beyond what you can control,” says Campion. “If you look back at those moments, they are often powerful awakenings, way beyond your comfort zone. There’s a sort of calling against decorum, against what’s best.”

Jane Campion, reflecting on her films, Wuthering Heights, and passion.

Eyes wide shut.

Netflix.jpg

Brilliant image for the Guardian’s piece on Netflix. It isn’t hyperbole, either. Netflix hasn’t been competing with Blockbuster or HBO or Amazon. They’e competing will Hollywood writ large—and have flawlessly taken away control of distribution and marketing from the studios and networks.

As Ben Thompson points out in aggregation theory, the company who owns the consumer interface wins. Netflix owns it—and will only concentrate it further in the years to come. The drama now is who wins the fight for the table scraps.

On art.

“I love the idea of “problematic.” Problematic art isn’t bad art, it’s art that has problems. “Problematic” is an idea that lets us lower the cost of acknowledging and fixing bad and wicked things in our world. Without “problematic,” all you have is “bad” and “good,” and that means that any stain on a piece of art that moved you, improved you, opened your horizons and lifted you up is a disqualifier — being virtuous means that you have to reject the art because of its irredeemable sins.”

Cory Doctorow, reflecting on Molly Ringwald’s essay about John Hughes, #metoo, and how the implications of art change over time.